Outside Announcements

  1. Senior Project “Yellow Reflection”

  2. Voices of the One Child Era: Chinese American Adoptee Documentary Films

  3. Museum of Chinese in America: Social Media Takeover

  4. Conference for Chinese Adoptees in the U.S.

  5. “Side by Side: Out of a South Korean Orphanage and Into the World" with Glenn Morey

  6. Delta Air Lines & StoryCorps Podcast

  7. Chinese Adoptee Living in America Research Project

  8. 30 Adoption Portraits in 30 Days

  9. The Adoption Network Law Center Scholarship Program for Birth Parents and Adopted Children

  10. Transracial Adoption of Chinese American Adoptees Study from California State University Chinese Adoptee

  11. New Documentary: One Child Nation


1. Senior project “yellow reflection”

Check out Carolyn’s message to learn more about her senior project, "Yellow Reflection" which is a continuation of"Made In China," a junior seminar project.

Hello,
For those who don't know me I am Carolyn Z. Spillane. I am a senior at Purchase College. I am working on my senior project which is of course about adoption. Last year I worked on an assignment about the voices of Chinese adoptees and the fact that even though we are "Made (born) in China" we are more than that. Please fill out the following form to participate in my senior project "Yellow Reflection."

[URL: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf0ArXYZCljVDLjMU52jlC548i4dXYWyUcwbSS_ZcYpqecx3w/viewform?fbclid=IwAR0_5WhExly32N0dYyQdAIZ8Tt3RZ4vciMOfPXNDDJYrq4zeLf-CcxDRVs4]

Any questions/concerns please email me carolynzspillane@gmail.com. Thank you for participating.

Dated October 17, 2019

2.Voices of the one child era: chinese american adoptee documentary films

SAVE THE DATE: Friday, Nov 15, 2019 @ 6:30pm - 8:00pm EST

Interested in Chinese American Adoptee documentaries? Please check out this great excerpt from Museum of Chinese in America’s website to learn more!

“Founded in 1980, Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) is dedicated to preserving and presenting the history, heritage, culture and diverse experiences of people of Chinese descent in the United States. The greatly expanded MOCA at 215 Centre Street will continue to be a national home for the precious narratives of diverse Chinese American communities, while striving to be a model among interactive museums.

Voices of the One Child Era: Adoption, Awareness & Identity is a series of programming devoted to telling a diverse range of stories of American adoptees from China. In this installment of the series, watch two documentary short films on birth parent searching, Ricki’s Promise (View Higher Films, 2014) and Meet Me on the Bridge: Discovering the Truth About my Parents After 20 Years (BBC, 2017). After, please join director Changfu Chang and adoptee stars of the respective films, Ricki Mudd and Kati Pohler, for a Q&A on the making of the films and updates on their stories since the films were made.”

Tickets are $15 and include wine, film screenings and Museum admission.

Purchase tickets here
Learn more about the featured stories here

Dated October 9, 2019

3. Museum of Chinese in America: Social Media Takeover

Voices of the One Child Era: Adoption, Awareness & Identity at the Museum of Chinese in America Looking for American Chinese Adoptees for Participation in Social Media Takeover

Check out this message from the Museum of Chinese in America to learn more!

ABOUT US:

We are a non-profit Museum and community organization located in the heart of Manhattan Chinatown that is dedicated to increasing the visibility of the myriad voices and identities that make up Chinese American history, while increasing local and global dialogue. In celebration of National Adoption Month and in honor of the 40th year anniversary of China's infamous One-Child Policy, MOCA is committed to devoting our programming to sharing the stories of and about American adoptees from China. Through a series of panel discussions, all of which will feature at least one adoptee voice, as well as this social media takeover highlighting a number of diverse stories from adoptees each week, MOCA aims to 1) foster a safe, supportive, and inclusive environment for adoptees within the Museum; and 2) raise awareness of a critical group within the Chinese American community and the current and future makeup of Chinese in America.

We are currently looking for adoptees who are interested in taking part in the Museum's Social Media Takeover!


RULES OF YOUR PARTICIPATION:

You MUST be an American adoptee from China and be 18 years of age or older to be featured in this coverage. You may fill out the form below anonymously or use your real name. All questions are optional. You may also fill out the form in regards to your own personal story, or on behalf of your work (ex. artwork, writing, or music), or on behalf of your organization (if the organization is somehow relevant to the adoption community). Please submit your responses no later than Friday, October 25.

RESULTS OF YOUR PARTICIPATION:

The content and image you provide below MAY be featured on MOCA's social media platforms (Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram: @mocanyc) during the month of November 2019. MOCA reserves the right to pull partial quotations from content provided and will always credit the author of the submission.

LINK:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdcYXxBdltyBf05Xjb3wg_sCepATqFdcbBx9WrbWgHkjkcLNw/viewform  

CONTACT: For questions and concerns, please contact Hailey Savage directly at hsavage@mocanyc.org

Dated October 5, 2019

4. conference for chinese adoptees in the u.s.

Interested in attending a conference for Chinese Adoptees in the U.S.? Check out this message from Katie to learn more!

Hi everyone! Currently a group of adoptees are organizing a conference for Chinese adoptees in the US, if you are interested in coming, please fill out this survey so we can get a better idea of when/where to organize it. Please pass this along to other adoptees you know who might be interested! Thanks so much☺️

Please contact nolank7@go.stockton.edu with any questions!

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc2FqhjKM0ZahUa7DKn8TGMOJigJ2nNlXddnuHYT1-LQ0P-7A/viewform?fbclid=IwAR0U3GeVtngPXuNsKlLbkItaOovsAU8_YLCZHk29-Wjc4JPMq4ujtdSYwPQ

Dated September 24, 2019

5.“Side by Side: Out of a South Korean Orphanage and Into the World" with Glenn Morey

SAVE THE DATE: Tuesday, October 1st at 6:30pm

Check out this eblast from Museum of Chinese in America for more information!

“The short film “Side by Side: Out of a South Korean Orphanage and Into the World” relates the first-person memories and experiences of nine adult inter-country adoptees born in South Korea as they recall their families of origin, their relinquishment to orphanages, and their adoptions and lives abroad. Filmed in New York City, Seattle, Chicago, Boston, Paris, Stockholm, Amsterdam, and Melbourne, this short documentary film is part of a large-scale, six year project encompassing 100 stories, seven countries, six languages, and 16 cities—available to view online here. Glenn Morey, producer and co-director, will introduce the film and take part in a Q&A afterward.

The Side by Side project is currently being shown as a 12-channel immersive video art exhibition at Waterfall Mansion & Gallery in New York. The exhibition will run until October 5. Learn more about the project and how you can visit the exhibition here.

Glenn and Julie Morey are a husband/wife filmmaking team, based in Denver, Colorado, USA. Glenn (AKA Kim Kang) was born in Seoul, South Korea, in 1960. He was abandoned days after birth, taken to Seoul City Hall, then to a Holt orphanage, and adopted at the age of 6 months to the US. Side by Side has been featured as a New York Times Op-Doc and on NPR’s Morning Edition on WNYC, and is an official selection of numerous film festivals across the US, including the Gold award for Best Documentary Short in the 2018 Social Justice Film Festival.”

Learn more about exhibit here http://www.waterfall-gallery.com/side-x-side-learn-more

Buy Tickets here https://my.mocanyc.org/3636/5284

Dated September 23, 2019

6. Delta air Lines & storycorps podcast

This was brought to my attention and thought it would be interesting to share. Read more to learn about this great opportunity!

ATTN INTERNATIONAL ADOPTEES! Are you interested in telling your story? Please read the following message we received:

Hi, I'm Jessica, working with Liz Lewis Casting in NYC. I'm working on a project in search of storytellers who have made geographical moves for work, love, community, etc. I saw your FB page when I started looking into stories about adoption. I hope you might be interested in sharing this info with your followers.

Delta Air Lines, in collaboration with the nonprofit organization StoryCorps, is creating a podcast that tells the stories of people who have made geographical moves that have shaped their identities. This podcast will celebrate the way home shapes us, what motivates us to move, and the things we learn when we venture past our doorstep.

Recording of the podcast will take place in NYC in October and chosen story tellers will get a 5 day all-expense-paid trip.

Please check out the application which has all the details and let me know if you have any questions: https://docs.google.com/…/1FAIpQLSc9VKT4gSVQF5rhM…/viewform…

It could be a great opportunity to talk about your filmmaking life! Plus, an all expense paid trip to NYC this October!!

Dated September 22, 2019

7. Chinese Adoptee living in america research project

Want to get involved in an adoption video? Read the message below from Tom to see if his project is something you'd be interested in!

$100 compensation for those who participate in a Skype interview.

My name is Thomas Mendosa, I am a researcher hired to conduct interviews and collect information about Chinese-adopted children raised in America. I am a film-school graduate passionate about film and human experience. It's my job to make sure the story we are trying to tell is as authentic and true as possible.

The project is a Chinese feature film, a fiction about a Chinese-adopted girl who is encouraged by her American-parents to find her biological parents in China. She is reluctant at first, entirely content with her current life in America. Her friends, her music, her culture. But she is persuaded to go to China, and an epic adventure ensues. She's thrust into this new world, desperately trying to find her biological parents. It's a total culture shock, everyone looks like her; she's never experienced this before. Why did her parents leave her? Did they love her? How will this change her? These are the essential questions and themes of the film.

For my research we'd like to interview a family who is still raising Chinese-adopted children (age roughly 10-16). We are located in Los Angeles, but we will fly to you, and with a small 2 person team, conduct about 3 days of filming footage of you doing activities around the house or town, and shoot interviews. We are willing to over compensation in exchange for your time.

Let me know if you'd be interested, our timing window is very short so sooner the better. We'd love to hear your story.

Please contact me at: tommendosa@gmail.com

Deadline: October 10, 2019

Dated September 15, 2019

8. 30 ADOPTION PORTRAITS IN 30 DAYS

30 Adoption Portraits in 30 Days is an annual series showcasing the experiences and impacts of adoption in honor of National Adoption Awareness Month this coming November. This series is meant to convey the abundance of different feelings, perspectives, and stories within adoption. Participants are welcomed to learn more about the project as well as submit their work here.

General requirements include:

  • Portrait that conveys experience of adoption

  • Personal essay of 1,000 - 3,000 words pertaining to the portrait

  • 2-3 sentence biography including any additional links 

 Deadline: October 1, 2019

From website, written by Carrie Goldman:

The series is designed to give a voice to many different people with widely varying perspectives on adoption. Some stories will describe heartwarming and uplifting experiences, while others will reflect the pain, darkness and loss often embedded in adoption.

In an effort to provide an authentic portrayal of what adoption means to different people, the series will feature guest posts by adoptees, birthparents, adoptive parents, relatives of adoptees, and foster parents.

We strongly suggest viewing the website before entering your submission in order to get a clear sense of what the project encompasses.    

Dated September 2, 2019

9.The Adoption Network Law Center Scholarship Program for Birth Parents and Adopted Children

In honor of November being National Adoption Month, the Adoption Network Law Center is giving scholarships amounting up to $10,000 to individuals seeking higher education.

Pre-Requisites:

  • Must be an adoptee or birth parent

  • Must be enrolled in some form of schooling (college, university, vocational, technical, trade)

Requirements:

  • Complete online application

  • Upload video that conveys how adoption has affected you

Deadline: October 15, 2019

Please visit here to learn more about the requirements and disclaimers regarding the scholarship. Best of luck.

Dated September 2, 2019

10. Transracial Adoption of Chinese American Adoptees Study from California State University Chinese Adoptee

Hello, my name is Nicolette. I am a graduate anthropology student at California State University Long Beach and am studying transracial adoption to specifically understand the effects on Chinese American adoptees’ identity development. To participate in my study please be over 18 years old, Chinese in ethnicity, and adopted by non-Asian parents in the United States. Participation in this study is completely voluntary and involves a short online survey. At the end of the survey, there will be an option to schedule a 30 min to one hour long interview via phone or video call, if you wish to talk further about your experiences.

Dated July 28, 2019

11. New film: one child nation

One_child_nation.jpg

Emmy-nominated filmmaker Nanfu Wang is releasing a new film that may be of interest to Chinese adoptees interested in the social, cultural, and economic context of China that led to a surplus of abandoned baby girls.

From the Sundance website:

In order to expose rampant human-rights abuses, filmmaker Nanfu Wang fearlessly confronted Chinese government agents in her 2016 Sundance Film Festival documentary, Hooligan Sparrow. Her goal in One Child Nation is no less daunting: unmask the tightly held secrets of China’s one-child policy and, in so doing, free the voices of millions irreparably harmed by the practice.

For Wang, now a first-time mother, investigating the policy of forcibly restricting family size spawns traumatic recollections from her own family’s recent past. These stories, in turn, unleash a dizzying number of revelations from journalists, officials, parents, and activists about the widespread enforcement of sterilization, child abandonment, and state-sponsored kidnappings.

With chilling clarity, Wang’s new documentary reveals how relentless propaganda brainwashed and terrorized countless Chinese citizens into committing unspeakable crimes against fellow villagers and family members. Through interviews with both victims and instigators, along with revelatory data regarding the sheer number of abandoned children (nearly all of them infant girls), One Child Nation breaks open decades of silence on a vast, unprecedented social experiment that shaped—and destroyed—countless lives.

Be aware - here is a note we have received from parent Peggy Scott regarding this film.

Dear CCI - RE:

One Child Nation movie

Release Date: Aug 9, 2019

See https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/one_child_nation for more information (scant now as it has not opened yet).

I got to see this movie at the San Francisco International Film Festival. It is extraordinary - powerful, devastating, brutal and excellently done. My daughter, age 25, has not seen it yet. I am writing to you since I have no business posting on your Facebook page, but I want adoptees to know how difficult it was for me (adoptive parent) to watch and I think it may be even harder for an adoptee to watch. Please take seriously its rating of R (for disturbing content/images,) because those images are truly haunting. I know that by now many of you are adults like my own daughter but in this case I just think some sort of warning for extremely sensitive content might be in order.

This movie knocked my socks off. I won't be surprised if it gets an Academy Award nomination. I think there will be a great deal of discussion when it finally opens. As hard as it was to watch, I am very glad I saw it.

**It has little or no understanding or sensitivity to adoption. It really is about China, policy, propaganda, infanticide, and cruel overzealous birth quota enforcement.**

I just want people to be warned what they might be getting into.

Thanks for listening.

Dated July 9, 2019